New York Times Promotes Perks Travel Agents Offer

by Richard D’Ambrosio
New York Times Promotes Perks Travel Agents Offer

The New York Times highlights the benefits for travelers of working with a travel agent. Photo: Gil C/Shutterstock.com


Dispelling the myths about travel agents being just another way to purchase travel, the Sunday New York Times will feature a story listing five benefits for travelers of working with a travel professional.

In the article, which already appears online, author Shivani Vora writes that, “Most people assume travel agents do little more than charge you money for booking trips, something most people are comfortable doing online. However, they can do a lot more beyond planning your vacations.”

Rob Karp, chief executive and founder of MilesAhead, a Valerie Wilson Travel agency, tells the Times that good advisers can help travelers “in all sorts of ways that most people don’t realize,” if they establish loyal, long-term relationships.

Vora lists five perks agents offer:

1. Helping during travel snags, including rebooking flights during cancellations or lengthy delays, and finding last-minute accommodations and tracking lost luggage. “Essentially, we can take the travel headache off your hands and make it ours,” Karp said.

2. Be your “trip concierge,” from soup to nuts. Vora lists services like handpicking destination guides, making restaurant reservations, securing theater tickets and “booking skip-the-line entrance tickets to museums.” She notes how these services might come with a fee ranging from $50 to a few hundred dollars, depending on the complexity of the requests, “but, unlike a hotel concierge, they don’t expect a gratuity for their services,” Vora writes.

3. Trip personalization. From vegans traveling in Italy to personalized welcome amenities at hotels, establishing a long-term relationship with a travel advisor can reap special rewards for travelers.

4. Manage “long-term travel planning.” Vora says agents can help prioritize travel bucket lists, because “some trips may make more sense at certain times in your life,” like waiting until children are in their teens for gorilla trekking in Rwanda.

5. Helping with other travel and entertainment desires. Local last-minute restaurant reservations and tickets to sold-out concerts are frequent requests for hooked-in travel advisors, the Times said.

  5
  0
Tip of the Day

That’s how you get to know your clients better, the nuances of their desires. Here’s a trick – story begets story. So, if what you want from them is a story, give them a story and they will give you a story back.

Kindra Hall, Steller Collective

Daily Top List

The Busiest U.S. Airports at Thanksgiving

1. Los Angeles International

2. Chicago O’Hare International

3. San Francisco International

4. Denver International

5. Boston Logan International

Source: Escape Here

TMR THIS WEEK
http://services.travelsavers.com/AMGService.svc/REST/GetImage?ImageID=09da61ac-0fec-e811-ba59-782bcb66a2f2

Guided Travel: It Hasn’t Lost Its Appeal

An easy sell for travel advisors is just the beginning of why this tried-and-true way of travel remains as popular as ever.

TMR Recommendations
Top Stories
Three Online Booking Horror Stories That Show the Value of a Good Travel Agent
Three Online Booking Horror Stories That Show the Value of a Good Travel Agent

While the OTAs promise consumers big savings on travel, there are many accounts of travelers being left stranded in far-away locales or having significant expenses added to their travels

Crystal-Balling the Travel Industry: Agents Give Their Predictions for 2019
Crystal-Balling the Travel Industry: Agents Give Their Predictions for 2019

As we enter the final quarter of 2018, Travel Market Report asked our readers what they predict the future will bring and what they are doing to prepare for 2019.

Supplier ‘Come Back’ Programs Raise Ire of Destination Wedding Specialists
Supplier ‘Come Back’ Programs Raise Ire of Destination Wedding Specialists

Travel advisors share their dissatisfaction with supplier programs that encourage guests to steer future bookings away from their agent.

Despite Record Disruptions, Most Travelers Still Don’t Opt for Insurance
Despite Record Disruptions, Most Travelers Still Don’t Opt for Insurance

One out of two vacationers still don’t purchase insurance, despite three out of four having dealt with flight delays, and nearly half having their luggage delayed or lost.

How to Use Stories to Sell Travel in Three Easy Steps
How to Use Stories to Sell Travel in Three Easy Steps

A motivational speaker urges travel advisors to grow their sales by honing their strategic storytelling skills.

Travel Industry Assesses Impact from Midterm Elections
Travel Industry Assesses Impact from Midterm Elections

Top Washington, D.C.-based associations begin to chart the impact on travel.

News Briefs
TMR Report Cards & Outlooks
Advertiser's Voice
Advertiser's Voice: Tauck