Canada Entry Rules To Change Sept. 30

by Richard D’Ambrosio
Canada Entry Rules To Change Sept. 30

Photo: Jeff Nelson.

Travelers flying to Canada starting Sept. 30 will experience a raft of new documentation requirements depending on their citizenship.

The rules are part of Canada’s Electronic Travel Authorization (eTA), established in 2011 to facilitate travel between the U.S. and Canada. A result of the eTA was an effort to more closely scrutinize foreign nationals from visa-exempt countries.

Up until the eTA, some countries authorized citizens to travel to Canada with only a passport, and without having to obtain a visa. As a result, foreigners from these countries were not subject to any screening until they arrived at an airport in Canada.

These foreigners will now have to obtain an eTA in their passport before they can board a plane flying to Canada. There is a (C)$7 application fee for the eTA, which is valid for up to five years. A traveler’s application can be rejected for a number of reasons, including certain prior criminal convictions, some serious medical conditions, past immigration refusals, or other security concerns.

U.S. citizens and travelers with a valid Canadian visa are exempt from the rules.

Beginning Sept. 30, Canadian citizens will no longer be allowed to board a flight to Canada using their foreign passport in combination with a citizenship card or a provincial driver’s license to confirm Canadian citizenship.

“A valid Canadian passport is the only reliable and universally accepted travel document that provides proof that you are a citizen and have the right to enter Canada without being subjected to immigration screening,” the Canadian government says, also reminding dual citizens that they ensure their passport doesn’t expire until “well beyond your planned return date.”

Canadians can renew their Canadian passport if their current passport is valid or expired for no more than one year, reflects the same name, sex, date of birth and place of birth that you would like to appear on your new passport, was issued to be valid for 5 or 10 years, has not been reported lost or stolen, and was issued when the traveler was at least 16 years of age.

In addition, permanent residents of Canada are required to obtain a valid Permanent Resident Card, or a Travel Document, as well as their passport, in order to board a plane to Canada.

Travel industry observers have been concerned this year that the implementation of the eTA has not been communicated broadly enough, and that as a result, many foreign nationals will find their travel plans to Canada are disrupted.

An eTA can be applied for online through Canada’s Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada’s website. Travelers denied an eTA because they are found to be inadmissible may be able to apply for a Temporary Resident Permit in order to enter Canada.

Travel agents can help clients determine what kind of travel documents are required by the eTA by visiting http://www.cic.gc.ca/english/visit/visas.asp.

  27
  10
Tip of the Day
Daily Top List

Most Useful Twitter Accounts for Travel Agents

1. AskTSA

2. FlightRadar24

3. Department of State

4. CLIA Global

5. ASTA

Source: TMR

TMR THIS WEEK
http://services.travelsavers.com/AMGService.svc/REST/GetImage?ImageID=01926fc8-d3f7-e711-80eb-782bcb667b27

Look to Luxury Land Clients When Filling Luxury Cruise Ships

Capturing the ‘not-so-new’ luxury travelers and converting them to luxury cruise passengers can lead to big business for travel agents.

TMR Recommendations
Top Stories
Vancouver and Toronto Regulate Short-Term Rentals
Vancouver and Toronto Regulate Short-Term Rentals

First set of city rules and regulations in Canada go into effect this year, likely reducing the number of short-term rental options for visitors.

Travel Professionals International Appoints Zeina Gedeon CEO
Travel Professionals International Appoints Zeina Gedeon CEO

The longtime travel industry executive had previously served as the president and CEO of Air Canada Vacations.

Bomb Cyclone Delay Raises Issue of Clients' Rights When Service Goes Awry
Bomb Cyclone Delay Raises Issue of Clients' Rights When Service Goes Awry

An airport incident between passengers and a Canadian airline in Boston during the “bomb cyclone” highlights the tensions that can rise when there are significant delays.

Transat Vice President Denise Heffron Announces Retirement
Transat Vice President Denise Heffron Announces Retirement

Heffron, who joined the Transat team in 1993, is retiring after almost 25 years of work with the company.

One Family's Epic Vacation Shows Value of a Good Travel Agent
One Family's Epic Vacation Shows Value of a Good Travel Agent

Sometimes your client is one question away from a life-changing trip. Family travel advisor Sally Black proves how much power lies in an agent’s knowledge and expertise.

Multi-Trip Travel Insurance Could Cost Less, But Has Low Awareness
Multi-Trip Travel Insurance Could Cost Less, But Has Low Awareness

This lesser known option has yet to catch on because most travelers aren’t aware of it, and agents are more inclined to sell single-trip policies.

News Briefs
Advertiser's Voice
Advertiser's Voice: Scenic Cruises